THE MINNEAPOLIS COMMITTEE OF THIRTEEN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE MINNEAPOLIS COMMITTEE OF THIRTEEN

Advocating for and advising Minneapolis teachers
about retirement security


With your support, the Committee of 13  advocates for our defined benefit pensions. We work to make sure that you have the facts about your MPS/TRA defined benefit pension. We also make sure that the  legislators who serve on  Minnesota's Legislative Commission on Pensions and Retirement have up-to-date information on MPS/TRA pensions.

 

We provide facts that counter the biased information distributed by groups

seeking to undermine our retirement security. You'll find up-to-date news from the Legislative Commission on Pensions and Retirement, the Minnesota Legislature and Congress on this page and in our latest newsletter. Come back often.  Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus--and check out our blog, too.

 

PENSIONS IN THE NEWS

Pension Spending Supports 6.2 Million Jobs, $943 Billion in Economic Input

WASHINGTON, D.C. July 30, 2014 – A new economic impact study Pensionomics 2014: Measuring the Economic Impact of Defined Benefit Pension Expenditures reports the national economic impacts of public and private pension plans, as well as the impact of state and local plans on a state-by-state basis. The study measures the economic ripple effect of retiree spending of pension benefit income, which typically is a stable source of income that lasts through retirement.

 

Pensions under attack:another manufactured crisis

JULY 25, 2014 - Minnesota 2020

 Publisher John Van Hecke writes that Minnesota’s pension problem is not the problem that conservative policy advocates assert. The problem, he notes,is that Minnesota would be better
off if more Minnesotans had pensions.

 

Anti-pension groups use old math, fuzzy data

JULY, 2014 – Economic Policy Institute

Ross Elsenberry writes that anti-government conservatives have been attacking public employees and their pensions for years, but the attacks picked up after the financial crisis in 2008. Rather than going after Wall Street and searching for ways to prevent a repeat of the sub-prime mortgage crisis or too-big-to-fail banking, which threatened the entire economy (and not just public employee pensions), conservatives are trying to use the crisis to cut pension benefits.